Playing with Plutarch with the artful aid of alliteration


After I had read our Plutarch lesson & Bengy and Moozle had taken turns narrating sections, I had them both write out a number of words starting with the letter \’t.\’
\’T\’ was the obvious letter to use as we\’re going through the life of Timoleon and just about everyone involved in the narrative has a name starting with that letter.
Then I asked them to write a short paragraph or verse relating to our reading using alliteration.
This was just a quick & rough exercise but they had a bit of fun.
Alliteration is enjoyable for a younger child to try – it\’s one of the more obvious and easiest poetic devices to use.
Bengy wrote:

Trustworthy Timoleon trusted
Tumultuous, tyrannical Timophanes
Who had a tendency to terrify
Tremendously true citizens
But Timophanes turned traitor
And Timoleon tried to tell him
To give his crown to the people
But tumultuous, tyrannical Timophanes
Laughed the trusted warnings aside
And so Timoleon, with tremendous tenacity
Therein killed Timophanes!

This is Moozle\’s (unedited) version where spelling goes out the window:

Timoleon tried to peswade his brother Timophanes to stop his tyranicall tyranny and thinking that his traterus tyranny would sucsed. He would be tyrannicly traiterus to the people, Timoleon said.
He already had a tyrannical aditude towards the peoples and it would not turn out well.

Edited copy:
Timoloeon tried to persuade his brother Timophanes to stop his tyrannical tyranny and thinking that his traitorous tyranny would succeed.
He would be tyrannically traitorous to the people, Timoleon said.
He already had a tyrannical attitude towards the peoples and it would not turn out well.

5 thoughts on “Playing with Plutarch with the artful aid of alliteration

  1. They are both great reads. What a great idea and well executed. It really requires you to use a richer vocabulary than you might with just a regular narration. Thanks for sharing these with us, Carol.

    Like

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