The Riddle of the Sands

The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers (subtitled, A Record of Secret Service) was published in 1903 and is considered to be the first modern spy thriller.Childers had an interesting background; he was raised in Ireland, educated at Cambridge, and was a clerk in the House of Commons for fifteen years. During the First … Continue reading The Riddle of the Sands

Love by Elizabeth von Arnim (1925)

This is only the second novel I’ve read by Elizabeth von Arnim, but along with Edith Wharton, she has shot up on my reading radar. Both authors have gotten under my skin with their beautiful literary writing and their sensitive treatment of women’s issues and sometimes difficult themes.In the context of the times in which … Continue reading Love by Elizabeth von Arnim (1925)

Rilla of Ingleside by L.M. Montgomery

Rilla of Ingleside was published in 1921 and is the eighth book in the Anne Series which began with Anne of Green Gables in 1908.Rilla is Anne’s youngest daughter and the story begins just prior or the start of WWI when Rilla is fifteen years of age.The tone of this book is more sombre than … Continue reading Rilla of Ingleside by L.M. Montgomery

Ten Favourite Books of a 15 Year Old

I asked my 15 yr old daughter to write a few words about the books she's enjoyed - she reads A LOT, so the following are books she's read or re-read recently or those that first came to mind about an hour ago when I asked her. Seven Daughters and Seven Sons - Barbara Cohen … Continue reading Ten Favourite Books of a 15 Year Old

The Lord of the Rings by J.R. Tolkien (1949)

  I've just remedied the possibility that I was perhaps one of the few people on the planet who had never read (or even watched) the The Lord of the Rings (LOTR). I did read The Hobbit aloud to my daughter a few years ago and enjoyed that and it was my plan to read … Continue reading The Lord of the Rings by J.R. Tolkien (1949)

The Making of a Marchioness by Frances Hodgson Burnett (1901)

    Emily Fox-Seton is the thirty-four year old protagonist of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s novel, The Making of a Marchioness. She is single, good-natured and hard-working and now that her mother is dead and the few relatives she has left have no intention of being burdened by her penniless state, she is making her own … Continue reading The Making of a Marchioness by Frances Hodgson Burnett (1901)

Ruth by Elizabeth Gaskell (1853)

    Ruth, Elizabeth Gaskell’s second book, was published in 1853 and is the surprisingly compassionate portrayal of a ‘fallen woman.' It contains elements that remind me of several books I’ve read:The Scarlet Letter (1850) with its religious hypocrisy; Tess of the d\'Urbervilles (1891), in that a naïve & vulnerable young woman is pressured into … Continue reading Ruth by Elizabeth Gaskell (1853)

Till We Have Faces by C.S. Lewis (1956)

    Cupid Finding Psyche by Sir Edward- Burne Jones (1865-1867)   Till We Have Faces is a book I’ve been avoiding for a while, mostly because I had the idea that it would be a stiff and ponderous read, but what a strangely captivating story it turned out to be!Subtitled, A Myth Retold, C.S. … Continue reading Till We Have Faces by C.S. Lewis (1956)

The Growth of a Soul: Daniel Deronda by George Eliot (1876)

  Daniel Deronda was George Eliot’s final novel and her most controversial work.The book contains a double plot, which was quite common with Victorian novelists such as Charles Dickens and William Thackeray, but Eliot took an unusual direction in this novel by introducing a Jewish theme. Between 1860 and 1874, the idea of re-establishing a … Continue reading The Growth of a Soul: Daniel Deronda by George Eliot (1876)